Drug: Apokyn (apomorphine)

What is apomorphine (Apokyn)? Apomorphine has some of the same effects as a chemical called dopamine, which occurs naturally in your body. Low levels of dopamine in the brain are associated with Parkinson's disease.Apomorphine is used to treat "wearing-off" episodes (muscle stiffness, loss of muscle control) in people with advanced Parkinson's disease.Apomorphine may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide.

Source: http://www.emedicinehealth.com

What are the possible side effects of apomorphine (Apokyn)? Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.Call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as:
  • nausea or vomiting that continues after taking an anti-nausea medication;
  • feeling like you might pass out;
  • dizziness, fainting, fast or pounding heartbeat, feeling short of breath;
  • depression, confusion, hallucinations, unusual or inappropriate behavior;
  • chest pain or heavy feeling, pain spreading to the arm or shoulder, nausea, sweating, general ill feeling;
  • slow heart rate, weak pulse, fainting, slow breathing (breathing may stop);
  • severe headache;
  • worsening of your Parkinson symptoms;
  • twitching or uncontrollable movements of your eyes, lips, tongue, face, arms, or legs; or
  • penis erection that is painful or lasts 4 hours or longer.
Less serious side effects may include:
  • drowsiness, yawning;
  • runny nose;
  • swelling in your hands or feet;
  • pale skin, increased sweating;
  • flushing, (warmth, redness, or tingly feeling); or
  • bruising, redness, pain, itching, or hardening of your skin where the injection was given.
This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Source: http://www.emedicinehealth.com

What other drugs will affect apomorphine (Apokyn)? Before using apomorphine, tell your doctor if you regularly use other medicines that make you sleepy (such as cold or allergy medicine, sedatives, narcotic pain medicine, sleeping pills, muscle relaxers, and medicine for seizures, depression, or anxiety). They can add to sleepiness caused by apomorphine.Many drugs can interact with apomorphine. Below is just a partial list. Tell your doctor if you are using:
  • arsenic trioxide (Trisenox);
  • blood pressure medications;
  • metoclopramide (Reglan);
  • sildenafil (Viagra), tadalafil (Cialis), or vardenafil (Levitra);
  • an antidepressant such as amitriptylline (Elavil, Vanatrip), clomipramine (Anafranil), or desipramine (Norpramin);
  • anti-malaria medications such as chloroquine (Arelan), or mefloquine (Lariam);
  • an antibiotic such as clarithromycin (Biaxin), erythromycin (E.E.S., EryPed, Ery-Tab, Erythrocin), levofloxacin (Levaquin), moxifloxacin (Avelox), or pentamidine (NebuPent, Pentam);
  • heart rhythm medicine such as amiodarone (Cordarone, Pacerone), dofetilide (Tikosyn), disopyramide (Norpace), ibutilide (Corvert), procainamide (Pronestyl), propafenone (Rythmol), quinidine (Quin-G), or sotalol (Betapace);
  • medicines to treat psychiatric disorders, such as chlorpromazine (Thorazine), clozapine (FazaClo, Clozaril), haloperidol (Haldol), pimozide (Orap), thioridazine (Mellaril), thiothixene (Navane), or ziprasidone (Geodon);
  • migraine headache medicine such as sumatriptan (Imitrex) or zolmitriptan (Zomig);
  • narcotic medication such as methadone (Dolophine, Methadose); or
  • nitrate medication, such as nitroglycerin (Nitro-Dur, Nitrolingual, Nitrostat, Transderm-Nitro, and others), isosorbide dinitrate (Dilatrate, Isordil, Isochron), or isosorbide mononitrate (Imdur, ISMO, Monoket).
This list is not complete and other drugs may interact with apomorphine. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

Source: http://www.emedicinehealth.com

What happens if I overdose (Apokyn)? Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222. Overdose symptoms may include nausea, extreme drowsiness, or fainting.

Source: http://www.emedicinehealth.com

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