Drug: nitroglycerin, nitroglycerin translingual, nitroglycerin transdermal, nitroglycerin intravenous, nitroglycerin topical

A persistent, throbbing headache commonly occurs with nitroglycerin therapy. Aspirin, acetaminophen (Tylenol and others), or ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin, Nuprin, and others) may be used to relieve the pain. Flushing of the head and neck can occur with nitroglycerin therapy as can an increase in heart rate or palpitations. This can be associated with a drop in blood pressure which can be accompanied by dizziness or weakness. To reduce the risk of low blood pressure, patients often are told to sit or lie down during and immediately after taking nitroglycerin. Other side effects include:
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Fainting
  • Blurred vision
Reference: FDA Prescribing Information

Source: http://www.medicinenet.com

Yes

Source: http://www.medicinenet.com

  • Tablets: 0.3, 0.4, 0.6 mg;
  • Capsules: 2.5, 6.5, 9 mg; Spray: 0.4 mg/spray;
  • Transdermal Patch: 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4, 0.6, 0.8 mg/hour;
  • Ointment: 2%;
  • Infusion Solution: 25, 50, 100 mg/250 ml
  • Injectable solution: 5 mg/ml.

Source: http://www.medicinenet.com

All formulations should be kept at room temperature, 15 C to 30 C (59 F to 86 F). The sublingual tablets are especially susceptible to moisture. They should NOT be kept in bathrooms or kitchens because of the greater moisture in these rooms. Care should be taken to replace the sublingual tablets every six months.

Source: http://www.medicinenet.com

For the treatment of acute angina attacks or for acute prevention (for example, immediately before encountering situations likely to bring on an anginal attack), one tablet is allowed to dissolve under the tongue or between the cheek and gums, or one spray is given of the lingual spray. Sublingual, spray and buccal nitroglycerin are rapidly absorbed from the lining of the mouth for immediate effects. This may be repeated every 5 minutes as needed. If angina is not relieved after a total of 3 doses, the patient should be taken to a hospital or a doctor should be contacted. If lingual spray is used, the canister of spray should not be shaken prior to use, and it should be sprayed onto or under the tongue and then the mouth closed. For prevention of angina, ointment may be applied using special dose-measuring application papers provided with the ointment. The usual dose is 1/2 to 2 inches applied every 4-6 hours. The appropriate amount of ointment is squeezed as a thin layer onto the paper, and the paper is used to spread the ointment onto a non-hairy area of the skin. The ointment should not be allowed to come into contact with the hands where it can be absorbed. Transdermal patches also are used for prevention. The usual dose is 0.2-0.8 mg/hr applied for 12 hours and then removed. An additional 12 hours should be allowed before applying the next patch because a 12 hour nitroglycerin free period reduces the occurrence of tolerance to the effects (reduced effectiveness) of nitroglycerin. Patches may be applied to any hairless site but should not be applied to areas with cuts or calluses which can alter absorption. Firm pressure should be used over the patch to ensure contact with the skin. The patch should not be cut or trimmed. Patches are waterproof and should not be affected by showering or bathing.

Source: http://www.medicinenet.com

It is not known if nitroglycerin is secreted in breast milk..

Source: http://www.medicinenet.com

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