Drug: ketorolac

Common side effects from ketorolac include:
  • rash,
  • ringing in the ears,
  • headaches,
  • dizziness,
  • drowsiness,
  • abdominal pain,
  • nausea,
  • diarrhea,
  • constipation,
  • heartburn, and
  • fluid retention.
NSAIDs reduce the ability of blood to clot and therefore increase bleeding after an injury. Ketorolac may cause ulcers and bleeding in the stomach and intestines, particularly with use for more than five days. Sometimes, stomach ulceration and intestinal bleeding can occur without any abdominal pain. Sometimes, the only signs or symptoms of bleeding may be:
  • black tarry stools,
  • weakness, and
  • dizziness upon standing (orthostatic hypotension).
NSAIDs reduce the flow of blood to the kidneys and impair function of the kidneys. The impairment is most likely to occur in patients with preexisting impairment of kidney function or congestive heart failure, and use of NSAIDs in these patients should be done cautiously. Liver failure has also been associated with ketorolac.

Source: http://www.medicinenet.com

Yes

Source: http://www.medicinenet.com

Tablets: 10 mg; Injection: 15 and 30 mg/ml.

Source: http://www.medicinenet.com

Tablets should be stored at 15 C to 30 C (59 F to 86 F). Injectable solution should be stored at 15 C to 30 C (59 F to 86 F) and protected from light.

Source: http://www.medicinenet.com

  • Treatment should be started with ketorolac injection.
  • Tablets are used only if treatment is continued after patients begin to eat and drink.
  • The total duration of therapy should not exceed 5 days because of the potential for gastrointestinal bleeding and other side effects.
  • The recommended adult intravenous single dose is 15 to 60 mg.
  • Multiple intravenous doses of 15 or 30 mg every 6 hours, not to exceed 60 or 120 mg a day, also may be used.
  • Following intravenous therapy, the recommended dose is 1 (10 mg) or 2 (20 mg) tablets initially followed by 1 (10 mg) tablet every 4-6 hours, not to exceed 40 mg daily.
  • The smaller dose is used for patients with poor kidney function or those older than 65 years.
  • Oral ketorolac is not approved for individuals less than 17 years of age.

Source: http://www.medicinenet.com

There are no adequate studies in pregnant women. Ketorolac should be used during pregnancy only if the potential benefit justifies the potential risk to the fetus. NSAIDs may cause cardiovascular side effects during late pregnancy.

Source: http://www.medicinenet.com

Ketorolac should not be used by nursing mothers because it is excreted in breast milk. Reference: FDA Prescribing Information

Source: http://www.medicinenet.com

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