Drug: vitamin K-1, phytonadione

Serious hypersensitivity reactions, including anaphylactoid reactions and death have been reported with use of injectable phytonadione. The majority of these cases were associated with use of intravenous phytonadione. Other side effects reported with use of injectable phytonadione include:
  • flushing,
  • injection site pain or discomfort,
  • taste disturbances,
  • dizziness,
  • rapid or weak pulse,
  • profuse sweating,
  • low blood pressure (hypotension),
  • shortness of breath, and
  • cyanosis.

Source: http://www.medicinenet.com

No

Source: http://www.medicinenet.com

  • Oral tablets: 5 mg, 100 mcg
  • Solution for injection: 10 mg/ml, 1 mg/0.5 ml

Source: http://www.medicinenet.com

Tablets should be stored at room temperature between 15 C and 30 C (59 F and 86 F). Injectable vitamin K should be stored in original container at controlled room temperature between 20 C and 25 C (68 F and 77 F), and should be protected from light.

Source: http://www.medicinenet.com

Oral vitamin K in Adults
  • For the treatment of anticoagulant-induced prothrombin deficiency: The initial recommended dose is 2.5 mg to 10 mg or up to 25 mg by mouth (rarely 50 mg).
  • For the treatment of hypoprothrombinemia due to other causes: the initial recommended dose is 2.5 mg to 25 mg or more (rarely up to 50 mg).
  • For the treatment of bleeding or bleeding prophylaxis in patients with warfarin toxicity: Adults with INR > 10 with no significant bleeding: administer 2.5-5 mg by mouth. Hold warfarin therapy.
  • Adults with serious bleeding at any elevation of INR: administer 5-10 mg intravenously by slow infusion in combination with 4-factor prothrombin complex concentrate. Hold warfarin therapy.
  • For the treatment of hemorrhagic disease of the newborn: administer 1 mg/dose/day intramuscularly (into the muscle) or subcutaneously (into the fatty tissue). Higher doses may be required if mother has been receiving treatment with oral anticoagulants.
  • For the prevention of hemorrhagic disease of the newborn: administer 0.5-1 mg intramuscularly within 1 hour of birth.

Source: http://www.medicinenet.com

It is not known if phytonadione is excreted into human milk. Because many drugs can enter breast milk and cause harm to the nursing infant, phytonadione should be used cautiously in nursing mothers. REFERENCE: FDA Prescribing Information.

Source: http://www.medicinenet.com

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