Drug: atazanavir

The most common side effects of atazanavir are rash, nausea, diarrhea, vomiting, headache, insomnia, dizziness, muscle pain, depression, fever, and abdominal pain. Atazanavir may cause jaundice by increasing bilirubin in the blood. Some patients also may see an increase in blood glucose levels or an increase or redistribution of body fat. Changes in body fat may include increased fat in the upper back and neck (buffalo hump), trunk and breasts. In a small number of patients atazanavir may decrease heart rate. In a small number of patients a serious condition called lactic acidosis--a build up of acid in the blood--may occur. Symptoms of lactic acidosis include persistent nausea, vomiting, weakness and trouble breathing. Individuals with bleeding disorders may bleed more when taking atazanavir. Reference: FDA Prescribing Information
Last Editorial Review: 9/5/2012

Source: http://www.medicinenet.com

Yes

Source: http://www.medicinenet.com

Capsules: 100, 150, 200, and 300 mg

Source: http://www.medicinenet.com

Atazanavir should be stored at room temperature, between 15 C to 30 C (59 F to 86 F).

Source: http://www.medicinenet.com

The starting dose of atazanavir for treatment naive adults is 300 mg atazanavir plus 100 mg ritonavir (Norvir) once daily with food or 400 mg atazanavir once daily with food if unable to tolerate ritonavir. Ritonavir increases the concentration of atazanavir in the blood. Efavirenz (Sustiva) decreases the concentration of atazanavir in the blood. Therefore, when patients are receiving both atazanavir and efavirenz, 100 mg ritonavir also should be added to 400 mg atazanavir in order to keep the levels of atazanavir in the blood at the desired levels. Adults who have previously received treatment should not be treated with atazanavir alone. They should receive atazanavir 300 mg plus ritonavir 100 mg once daily or atazanavir 400 mg plus ritonavir 100 mg once daily if also receiving H2-antagonists and tenofovir (Viread) (see drug interactions).

Source: http://www.medicinenet.com

Atazanavir has not been adequately studied in pregnant women.

Source: http://www.medicinenet.com

Atazanavir has not been adequately studied in nursing mothers. Scientific experts advise HIV-infected mothers not to breastfeed because of the risk of transmitting HIV to the infant.

Source: http://www.medicinenet.com

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